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Amazing Thailand Hotels Resorts Spa

Doi Suthep Chiang Mai Thapae Gate Suthep Chiang Mai Doi Suthep Chiang Mai

Special Promotion Chiang Mai Hotels

 
 
Hotels Chiangmai Amora Tapae Hotel 22 Chaiyapoom Road, Amphur Muang, Chiang Mai 50300

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Khum Phaya Resort Spa 137 Moo 5 Tumbol Nong Pa Krang, Chiangmai 53000

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Lanna Palace 2004 Hotel 184 Chang Klan Road,
Chiang Mai 50100

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Imperial Mae Ping Hotel 153 Sridonchai Road,
Amphur Muang, Chiang Mai 50100
 
Food & Fruit in Thailand
 
 

Thai food is internationally famous. Whether chilli-hot or comparatively bland, harmony is the guiding principle behind each dish. Thai cuisine is essentially a marriage of centuries-old Eastern and Western influences harmoniously combined into something uniquely Thai. The characteristics of Thai food depend on who cooks it, for whom it is cooked, for what occasion,  and where it is cooked to suit all palates. Originally, Thai cooking reflected the characteristics of a waterborne lifestyle. Aquatic animals, plants and herbs were major ingredients. Large chunks of meat were eschewed. Subsequent influences introduced the use of sizeable chunks to Thai cooking.

With their Buddhist background, Thais shunned the use of large animals in big chunks. Big cuts of meat were shredded and laced with herbs and spices. Traditional Thai cooking methods were stewing and baking, or grilling. Chinese influences saw the introduction of frying, stir frying and deep-frying. Culinary influences from the 17th century onwards included Portuguese, Dutch, French and Japanese. Chillies were introduced to Thai cooking during the late 1600s by Portuguese missionaries who had acquired a taste for them while serving in South America.

Thais were very adapt at 'Siamese-ising' foreign cooking methods, and substituting ingredients. The ghee used in Indian cooking was replaced by coconut oil, and coconut milk substituted for other daily products. Overpowering pure spices were toned down and enhanced by fresh herbs such as lemon grass and galanga. Eventually, fewer and less spices were used in Thai curries, while the use of fresh herbs increased. It is generally acknowledged that Thai curries burn intensely, but briefly, whereas other curries, with strong spices, burn for longer periods. Instead of serving dishes in courses, a Thai meal is served all at once, permitting dinners to enjoy complementary combinations of different tastes.

A proper Thai meal should consist of a soup, a curry dish with condiments, a dip with accompanying fish and vegetables. A spiced salad may replace the curry dish. The soup can also be spicy, but the curry should be replaced by non spiced items. There must be a harmony of tastes and textures within individual dishes and the entire meal.

Fruit in Thailand

Thai FruitFruit, not surprisingly, is a cornerstone of the Thai diet. Thais don’t generally sit down to their three square meals a day, but tend to nibble from the time they get up until they pack it in at night. (They must have the most well-toned jaw muscles in the world.) Much of the time this snacking style of eating involves fruit.

In keeping with this fruit obsession, many areas of the country hold annual fruit festivals during the month of May, when many of the Thailand’s fruits come into their peak season. The festival includes cooking contests, parades, farm tours, and of course, beauty contests (where a young girl gets to hold the dubious title of “Miss Durian” for a whole year!).

Unlike most westerners, Thais often eat fruits before they are fully ripe and like most Thai cuisine, combine the sweet, sour and savory. A prime example of this is the famous dish somtam, which is shredded green papaya pounded in a mortar with chillis, peanuts, lemon juice, fish sauce (and other ingredients which vary regionally), and eaten with sticky rice. Most people from the northeast eat this spicy concoction every day.

MangoMangos are another fruit that most Thais prefer to eat while still green, dipping it into a mixture of salt, sugar and chillis. There is an exception though – mango and sticky rice, which may well be the most delightful yet simple dessert ever concocted. Sweet, delicate ripe mangos like the smiles of angels are laid over top of sticky rice and drizzled with sweetened coconut milk. If you get a chance to try this one, seize it with both hands – it is gorgeous.

Fruit has even moved into the realm of art in Thailand. Fruit carving is a long-standing tradition that has reached such a high level that the country’s countless cooking schools offer courses in the subject – popular with tourists on learning vacations.

While there are many fruits you may already be familiar with, there are some exquisite ones that many Westerners have never seen or heard of – so there are some pleasant surprises in store.

The more familiar ones on the list are strawberries (grown in the cool air of the northern mountains), watermelons (very sweet), grapes, pineapples, papayas, bananas (in more shapes, colors and sizes than you might have thought possible), mangos, and coconuts (technically a nut, not a fruit, but it goes so nicely on a fruit platter).

Some of the more “exotic” fruits you’ll encounter during the May festival are:

Durian:
Durian
This large, hard, spiky fruit looks more like a weapon than something edible – and some say its pungent aroma is something of a weapon as well. Though it gives off the smell of a compost heap, the soft, slightly fibrous flesh inside the vicious exterior is very creamy (and high in calories, by the way). Though this one isn’t for everybody, those who take to it tend to love it with a passion, regarding it as the king of fruits.

Lynchee:
Lynchee
Sweet, juicy fruit inside a hard, red peel. Favorite in Thailand and Asia. Though it originates in China, Thailand has mastered a juicy version that is sweet with a pleasant tartness. For those who haven’t encountered it, the lynchee has a thin, brittle red skin that peels off easily to reveal a huge grape-like flesh surrounding a smooth brown stone. These ones can be a little pricey, but well worth it.

MangosteenMangosteen:
This dark purple fruit is rarely found outside the tropics, because it doesn’t travel well. It has a thick, dark purple bitter skin, which breaks open easily to reveal a white-segmented flesh that looks something like a little brain. The taste is indescribable, but in my experience, everyone who tastes it for the first time enjoys something resembling a religious experience. It is sweet and tangy and tongue smacking. Trust me – try one, it won’t be your last.

Rambutan:
RambutanYou occasionally see these in Chinatown markets in western countries, but it’s unlikely you’d recognize them as a fruit. About the size of an egg, they are covered with a thick skin with hairy soft spikes – when ripe the main body is red and the spikes are green. They look a bit like an unhusked chestnut. When cut or split open the inside is grapelike, similar to a lychee, but the flavor is quite different. They are sweet, mildly flavored and highly addictive – you can work your way through a small mountain of them in a single sitting. Because the rambutan tree has such a high yield, at peak season in May and June, they are so cheap as to be virtually free. You can eat them until you are blue in the face for less than a dollar.

So if you happen to visit Thailand in May, don’t miss out. With all that fiber and vitamins, it could be the healthiest holiday you ever had.

Eating Thai Food

Thai food is eaten with a fork and spoon. Even single dish meals such as fried rice with pork, or steamed rice topped with roasted duck, are served in bite-sized slices or chunks obviating the need for a knife. The spoon is used to convey food to the mouth.

Ideally, eating Thai food is a communal affair involving two or more people, principally because the greater the number of diners the greater the number of dishes ordered. Generally speaking, two diners order three dishes in addition to their own individual plates of steamed rice, three diners four dishes, and so on. Diners choose whatever they require from shared dishes and generally add it to their own rice. Soups are enjoyed concurrently with rice. Soups are enjoyed concurrently with other dishes, not independently. Spicy dishes, not independently. Spicy dishes are "balanced" by bland dishes to avoid discomfort.

The ideal Thai meal is a harmonious blend of the spicy, the subtle, the sweet and sour, and is meant to be equally satisfying to eye, nose and palate. A typical meal might include a clear soup (perhaps bitter melons stuffed with minced pork), a steamed dish (mussels in curry sauce), a fried dish (fish with ginger), a hot salad (beef slices on a bed of lettuce, onions, chillies, mint and lemon juice) and a variety of sauces into which food is dipped. This would be followed by sweet desserts and/or fresh fruits such as mangoes, durian, jackfruit, papaya, grapes or melon.

Thai Meal

Titbits
These can be hors d'oeuvres, accompaniments, side dishes, and/or snacks. They include spring rolls, satay, puffed rice cakes with herbed topping. They represent the playful and creative nature of the Thais.

Salads
A harmony of tastes and herbal flavours are essential. Major tastes are sour, sweet and salty. Spiciness comes in different degrees according to meat textures and occasions.

General Fare
A sweet and sour dish, a fluffy omelette, and a stir-fried dish help make a meal more complete.

Dips
Dips entail some complexity. They can be the major dish of a meal with accompaniments of vegetables and some meats. When dips are made thinly, they can be used as salad designs. A particular and simple dip is made from chillies, garlic, dried shrimps, lime juice, fish sauce, sugar and shrimp paste.

Soups
A good meal for an average person may consist simply of a soup and rice. Traditional Thai soups are unique because they embody more flavours and textures than can be found in other types of food.

Curries
Most non-Thai curries consist of powdered or ground dried spices, whereas the major ingredients of Thai curry are fresh herbs. Asimple Thai curry paste consists of dried chillies, shallots and shrimp paste. More complex curries include garlic, galanga, coriander roots, lemon grass, kaffir lime peel and peppercorns.

Single Dishes
Complete meals in themselves , they include rice and noodle dishes such as Khao Phat and Phat Thai.

Desserts
No good meal is complete without a Thai dessert. Uniformly sweet, they are particularly welcome after a strongly spiced and herbed meal.

Preparing Thai Food

Titbits
A simple kind of titbit is fun to make. You need shallots, ginger, lemon or lime, lemon grass, roasted peanuts and red phrik khi nu chillies. Peeled shallots and ginger should be cut into small fingertip sizes. Diced lime and slices of lemon grass should be cut to the same size. Roasted peanut should be left in halves. Chillies should be thinly sliced. Combinations of such ingredients should be wrapped in fresh lettuce leaves and laced with a sweet-salty sauce made from fish sauce, sugar, dried shrimps and lime juice.

Dips
Mixing crushed fresh chillies with fish sauce and a dash of lime juice makes a general accompanying sauce for any Thai dish. Adding some crushed garlic and a tiny amount of roasted or raw shrimp paste transforms it into an all-purpose dip (nam phrik). Some pulverised dried shrimp and julienned egg-plant with sugar makes this dip more complete. Serve it with steamed rice, an omelette and some vegetables.

Salad Dressings
Salad dressings have similar base ingredients. Add fish sauce, lime juice and sugar to enhance saltiness, sourness and sweetness. Crushed chillies, garlic and shallots add spiciness and herbal fragrance. Lemon grass and galanga can be added for additional flavour. Employ this mix with any boiled, grilled or fried meat. Lettuce leaves, sliced cucumber, cut spring onions and coriander leaves help top off a salad dressing.

Soup Stocks
Soups generally need good stock. Add to boiling water crushed peppercorns, salt, garlic, shallots, coriander roots, and the meats or cuts of one's choice. After prolonged boiling and simmering , you have the basic stock of common Thai soups. Additional galanga, lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, crushed fresh chillies, fish sauce and lime juice create the basic stock for a Tom Yam.

Curries
To make a quick curry, fry curry or chilli paste in heated oil or thick coconut milk. Stir and fry until the paste is well cooked and add meats of one's choice.Season with fish sauce or sugar to taste. Add water or thin coconut milk to make curry go a longer way. Add sliced eggplant with a garnish of basil and kaffir lime leaves. Make your own curry paste by blending fresh (preferably dried) chillies, garlic, shallots, galanga, lemon grass, coriander roots, ground pepper, kaffir lime peels and shrimp paste.

Single Dish Meals
Heat the cooking oil, fry in a mixture of crushed chillies, minced garlic, ground pepper and chopped chicken meat. When nearly cooked, add vegetables such as cut beans or eggplants. Season with fish sauce and garnish with kaffir lime leaves, basil or balsom leaves. Cooked rice or fresh noodles added to the frying would make this a substantial meal.

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Destinations in Thailand

 
   

Hotels in Chiang Mai

 
Airport Resident
Amora Tapae Hotel
Angkhang Nature Resort
Aomdoi Resort
Arun Tara Hotel
Assaradevi Villa and Spa
At Niman
At Pingnakorn Hotel
Away Suwansawan Maerim
Ayatana Hamlet and Spa
B2 Premier Chiangmai Resort & Spa
Baan Canna Country Resortl
Baan Deva Montra Boutique Resort
Baan Gong Kham
Baan Saen Doi Resort & Spa
Baan Sing Kham
Ban Sabai Village Resort & Spa
Bann Tazala Boutique Hotel
Banthai Village
Belle Villa Resort
Bodhi Serene
Bossotel Inn
Botanic Resort
BP Chiang Mai City Hotel
Bulun Buri Resort
Buri Gallery House
Butterfly
C H Hotel
Centara Duangtawan Hotel
Chateau Chiangmai Hotel
Chiang Mai Orchid Hotel
Chiang Mai Plaza Hotel
Chiangmai Garden Hotel & Resort
Chiangmai Gate Hotel
Chiangmai Grandview Hotel
Chiangmai Hills 2000 Hotel
Chiangmai Phucome Hotel
Chiangmai Ratanakosin Hotel
Chiangmai Suandok Kaew Hotel
De Naga
Doi Kham Resort
Down Town Inn
Dreamcatchers Bed & Breakfast
DusitD2 Hotel Chiang Mai
Empress Hotel
Eurana Boutique Hotel
Fern Paradise
Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai
Fondcome Village Resort
Golden Cupids Hotel
Green Lake Resort
Hmong Hilltribe Lodge
Holiday Garden Hotel
Holiday Inn
Horizon Village
HUB53 Chiang Mai House
Imm Hotel Thaphae Chiang Mai
Imperial Chiang Mai Sports Clubs
Imperial Mae Ping Hotel
INSDA Luxery Private House
Jasmine Hills Lodge
Jirung Health Resort
Kantary Hills
Kaomai Lanna Resort
Khocha Sri Thani Chiang Mai
Kireethara Boutique Resort
Krisdadoi Chiangmai
Khum Phaya Resort & Spa
Lanna Mantra Relais
Lanna Palace 2004 Hotel
Lanna Resort
Lanna View Hotel & Resort
Lotus Pang Suan Kaew Hotel
Mae Rim Lagoon Hotel
Mae Sa Valley
Maekok River Village Resort
Manathai Village
Mandarin Oriental Dhara Dhevi
Maninarakorn Hotel
Marisa Resort & Spa
Montrara Happy House Hotel
Muang Gudi Lodge
Natural Wellness Resort
Na Thapae Hotel
Navasoung Resort
Noble Place
Oasis Hotel
Panviman Chiangmai Resort & Spa
Park Hotel
Phu Jaya Mini Resort
Plumeria Home
Pornping Tower
Portico 21
Proud Phu Fah
Puripunn Baby Grand Boutique
Rachamankha
Rainforest & Pornpiroon Hotel
Raming Lodge Hotel & Spa
Rarinjinda Wellness Spa Resort
Ratilanna Riverside Spa Resort
Rawee Waree Resort & Spa
Rimping Village
Royal Guest House
Royal Lanna Hotel
Royal Orchid Park
Royal Panerai Hotel
Royal Peninsula Hotel
Royal Princess Chiang Mai
Ruen Come In
Saimoonburi Resort
Scorpion Tailed Boat Village
Shewe Wana Boutique Resort Spa
Sinthana Resort
Sirilanna
Siripanna Villa Resort & Spa
Sri-Ping Resort
Star Hotel
Studio 99 Serviced Apartments
Suan Bua Resort & Spa
Sukantara Cascade Resort
Suriwongse Hotel
Tamarind Village
Taraburi Resort & Spa
Tarin Hotel
The Airport Greenery
The Amata Lanna Chiangmai
The Chedi Chiang Mai
The Dome Residence
The Eurasia Chiangmai Hotel
The Grand Napat
The International Hotel
The Karinthip Village
The Nest Chiangmai
The Rim Resort Chiang Mai
The Small Hotel
Tianna Garden Village
Touch Star Resort Inthanon
Tri Yaan Na Ros Colonial House
U Chiang Mai
Veranda Chiangmai High Resort
View Doi Art & Resort
Winner Inn Hotel
Yaang Come Village
Yesterday The Village
 

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